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About Sage Thornbrugh

Junior

Sage Thornbrugh

Global Studies/Political Science

Connect with Sage Thornbrugh

Twitter: @SageThornbrugh

Sage Thornbrugh: scholar, athlete, video game enthusiast, German when I want to be, American when I have to be. Spent thirteen years of my incredibly fascinating life in Vilseck, Germany, which somehow led me to this place named Concordia College. I’m not a big fan of the cold, but I’m a fan of most things Concordia. I play soccer here, I work here, I study here; there’s not many things I do that aren’t related to the college. Maybe you’ll find something I ramble on about half-interesting.

Sage Thornbrugh

Ireland Pt. 2: The Guinness Storehouse

Posted in Sage Thornbrugh on February 20th, 2016 by Sage Thornbrugh – Comments Off on Ireland Pt. 2: The Guinness Storehouse
Myself, Alan, Taylor, and Trevor, pictured behind the bar at the Guinness Storehouse.

Myself, Alan, Taylor, and Trevor, pictured behind the bar at the Guinness Storehouse.

Another place which we wanted to squeeze into our first day activities was the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin. For those of you who don’t know, Guinness is a dark beer brewed in Ireland, originally brewed in Dublin itself, while present breeding takes place elsewhere.

The Storehouse was pretty sweet. We paid 12 Euro for entrance, and your entrance gets you self-guided tour access throughout the entirety of the building, along with a taste-testing session and a free Guinness beer at the end of the tour, at the sky bar.

After doing the tour and learning about the history of the Guinness brewing process, we eventually made our way to the taste-testing session, which was pretty tasty, if I may say so. I was previously not a fan of Guinness, but this experience changed my perspective of the beer.

To close, rather than have our drinks made for us at the top of the bar, you can get your drink by being taught how to pour the “perfect pint,” by a trained bartender. Essentially, you just pour at a 45 degree angle until it is about a third of the way full, let it rest for a bit, and then pour the rest of the way. Which is basically how you pour any other beer. All in all, the Guinness Storehouse is absolutely a must-see if you go to Dublin.

Ireland Pt. 1: Lack of Sleep

Posted in Sage Thornbrugh on February 20th, 2016 by Sage Thornbrugh – Comments Off on Ireland Pt. 1: Lack of Sleep
The first place I fell asleep in, which was our lunch at Eddie Rocket's.

The first place I fell asleep in, which was our lunch at Eddie Rocket’s.

Trevor and I maybe didn’t take the greatest precautions in our preparations for our flights. First of all, flying out on Friday at 7am, neither of us had packed until Friday morning. I realized I had forgotten my bag once I arrived at the airport, which is another story altogether. Neither of us really slept until about 2 am, waking up around 5!

Initially the plan was to not sleep, or to sleep a very minimal amount in order to sleep on all of the flights over, thus leaving us on the correct sleep schedule upon our arrival. That didn’t happen. Rather, I slept for about three hours at home, and maybe about three hours in total on all flights, thus leaving me pretty groggy and sleepy once we had arrived in Dublin, where we were to spend our first few days (our first day we met up with friend, teammate, and fellow Cobber Alan Scheuermann).

We survived without too much napping, though. I only took a nap at lunch and dinner, after we had finished the meals. The sad thing was that I didn’t manage to make it out of the restaurants before falling asleep. It’s gonna be tough to really get on a good sleep schedule.

New Boots

Posted in Sage Thornbrugh on February 20th, 2016 by Sage Thornbrugh – Comments Off on New Boots
My new boots, which were being showcased at our hostel in Dublin.

My new boots, which were being showcased at our hostel in Dublin.

Since I was heading to Ireland next week–a place which is renowned for its rainy, overcast weather–I figured it might be time to actually invest in a nice pair of boots. Having seen many of my friends invest in a few pairs, and realizing that they’d be pretty useful to have around Moorhead as well, I decided to pull the trigger and buy a nice, solid pair of boots.

Mostly is was two of my roommates, Kessler and Trevor, who turned me on to them. I figured that, dude to their race reviews of wearing boots around Concordia, they would not only be good to have when traveling to countries with inclement weather, but also the chilly Fargo-Moorhead area as well.

So far, so good, then. I haven’t been able to wear them in Moorhead yet, but I can tell that they will be a pretty good thing to have around. They’ve definitely done the job while in Ireland, despite being a bit of a pain to break in. They’ve lasted through the first day of Irish rain, and seem to be doing so with aplomb. They’re lined with wool too, making them ridiculously warm, and are basically waterproof. If they can survive the Irish rain and wind, they can probably survive Moorhead winters. At least I hope so! If you are thinking of coming to Concordia, you should consider investing in a nice pair of boots.

Budget Cuts

Posted in Sage Thornbrugh on February 12th, 2016 by Sage Thornbrugh – Comments Off on Budget Cuts
The front page of the Concordian, which focuses on the budget cuts as well.

The front page of the Concordian, which focuses on the budget cuts as well.

Ahh, yes. The talk of the town. Right now it seems as though everyone is discussing the fact that Concordia College is having to make some significant budget cuts in order to balance the books and keep marching forward.

It certainly seems as though everyone has something to say about it. I’ve heard plenty of conversations in the last week relating to why certain programs were cut from the college, why other programs couldn’t take any cuts, and why some programs even existed in the first place. There is no shortage of opinions on the matter.

I’m not here to give you too much of an opinion. All I can say is that my majors–Global Studies and Political Science– weren’t hit too hard. It doesn’t look like any faculty were cut, but there may have to be some program restructuring in the future to consolidate the department.

In my personal opinion, I think it’s a good idea for the college to cut programs with very few students in order to focus on the strongest programs, while also targeting students from new areas and appealing to students who want to attend the stronger programs. But my opinion doesn’t matter, because I’m not the one who is in charge of decision making. I am much less informed than those people.

Sunday Traditions

Posted in Sage Thornbrugh on February 12th, 2016 by Sage Thornbrugh – Comments Off on Sunday Traditions
The pancake on the left was pretty good, while the one on the right wasn't very filling, unfortunately.

The pancake on the left was pretty good, while the one on the right wasn’t very filling, unfortunately.

I like to have traditions. Whether they be personal, with a friend or two, or entire family-based traditions, there’s something valuable about continuing something throughout a long period of time.

Back at home, my mom and dad would take turns making pancakes every Sunday morning. That was probably my favorite family tradition.After a long Saturday of soccer, hanging out with friends, and playing video games, I would wake up to the refreshing smell of pancakes at around 11 in the morning (that was the latest my mom tried to let me sleep on weekends). The sleeping members of my family would all convene upstairs before making our way downstairs in order to see the glorious pancakes that had been lovingly bestowed upon us by the house elders.

I think that Sunday pancakes are something that I want to continue once college is done. It’s hard to keep up with every Sunday right now, due to the fact that I probably have homework or something else that keeps me from taking too much personal time. Last Sunday I cooked some pancakes because I had a lot of free time, and I realized how much I missed having pancakes every Sunday. I miss Sunday traditions a lot.